Le Salon des Refusés #2

January 31st – 2018. Cafe Koi. Le Salon des Refusé returns for its 2nd evening of ridiculous material. Our first evening presented AFTER US THE SAVAGE GOD in 2016. This time out we present WAITING FOR GORDO by Mike Czuba. (Cast to be finalized – but rumour has it the band is getting back together.)

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* A play, based on a screenplay by Mike Czuba, Andrew Kenneth Martin and Gordon Currie, based ever-so losely on another play by some other dude and influenced by a single epidsode of the Six-Million Dollar Man. In no way does the content of this play infringe on the copywright of any other plays with similar titles. Any similarites to any other persons or characters alive or dead is 100% coincidental and should be treated as such. If you have to ask if something is real… it already is.

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New – *PAGE ONE – REPRISE

The latest instalment of *PAGE ONE:  Actor Tristan D. Lalla reading p.39 of REPRISE by Mike Czuba.

**Page One is a video initiative by Dancing Monkey Laboratories to connect with actors, dancers, designers, and anyone else really, to read the first page of one of Mike Czuba’s plays (*or – a page from anywhere in the text, or the last page, or a collection of sections, eventually even the screenplays – it’s flexible – and contains many an ‘ish’ as is suggested by Nocturology‘s non-existent, yes strongly suggested, theatrical guidelines.)

Humanoid Workshop Video.

For those who could not make it to the TJLab outcome on December 1st. Here is a video* of the evenings work.

Theatre Junction‘s TJlab sessions are an invaluable opportunity for artists and collectives like ours to have the ability to explore new material at a high level, within a beautiful, intimate space, with lights, live music and tech support.

Filmed by Kevin Dong.
Full credits of the residency HERE.

*the video was created for our own archival and documenting purposes – shared here for the curious.

A Savage God in Calgary.

October 18th – Dancing Monkey Laboratories presents a staged reading of Mike Czuba’s play: AFTER US THE SAVAGE GOD.

“A play that speaks directly to our current political environment. One part (un)historical biography – one part biting satire on our modern media.”

**Warning: Contains Adult language, fluids and depravity.

The readers are: Michelle BRANDENBURG, Lonni OLSON, Dean COMBITSIS, Filsan DUALEH and Melissa TUPLIN.

The history books all suggest the writer and full time lunatic, Alfred Jarry, died from a combination of malnutrition and a super-human consumption of alcohol. After Us The Savage God will offer another hypothesis – Time travel.

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A Review from Chicago.

A review from Bob  Lichtenbert (meaninginart.orgof Mike Czuba’s Satie et Cocteau.
Produced by Genesis Theatrical Productions. Directed by Elayne LeTraunik.
Featuring: Scott Purdy as Cocteau and Dwight Sora as The Actor (Satie)

“Satie et Cocteau” by Genesis Theatrical Productions (Meaning Grade: 89%) features surrealist poet Jean Cocteau’s attempting to deal with the death of his friend, the composer Eric Satie, by directing an actor in a play that the poet wrote about the musician. As Cocteau was doing surrealism years before this arts movement emerged, this play represents imagination squared, but not much about the physical world.

Although it is sometimes hard to tell the difference between waking, dreams and opim-induced states, that is not the point. The point seems to create more and better reality through the arts. Thus, this play attains a high level of meaning since it is so well acted, directed and designed, mostly by plastic tubular pipes.

What I enjoyed most about this play was playwright Mike Czuba’s frequent references to basic ideas in the arts, poetry and life, for example: “the truth is a lie in the theater; don’t think, be; Cocteau aims to find the essence of poetry by looking for the life that is not seen-intangible! And he can make a circle of light around an actor; we are dreams, fantasies and illusions to be alive.”

I find all these statements fundamental and inspiring, even though Satie lambastes critics as too realistic.

“Satie et Cocteau” begins as a “memory of a memory of an actual event” between the two innovative artists. Cocteau admits that it ends as more of a masquerade probably because it reflects poorly on him.

Robert Lichtenbert,

May 21, 2016